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Coenen named UGA law school associate dean for faculty development

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Writer: Crissinda Ponder, 706/542-5253, lawprstu@uga.edu Contact: Heidi Murphy, 706/542-5172, hmurphy@uga.edu

Coenen named UGA law school associate dean for faculty development

Athens, Ga. - University of Georgia School of Law faculty member Dan T. Coenen has been named the school's new associate dean for faculty development. In this role, he will work closely with the law school's faculty, especially its junior professors, to expand and promote scholarly activities.

Georgia Law Dean Rebecca Hanner White said, "I am so pleased Dan will be serving as associate dean for faculty development. Dan is one of our finest scholars, and I am delighted our junior faculty will be working with and learning from Dan in his capacity as associate dean."

Coenen, who also holds the Harmon W. Caldwell Chair in Constitutional Law, began teaching at Georgia Law in 1987 and has received numerous honors for his work both in and out of the classroom. In 2005, he was named a University Professor, a title awarded to no more than one UGA faculty member a year. He is also a recipient of the Josiah Meigs Award, the university's highest honor for excellence in teaching.

Specializing in the areas of contracts and constitutional law, Coenen's scholarship includes The Story of The Federalist: How Hamilton and Madison Reconceived America, in addition to numerous articles appearing in such prestigious journals as The Yale Law Journal, the Duke Law Journal and the Michigan Law Review.

Before joining the law school faculty, Coenen served as a judicial clerk for U.S. Supreme Court Justice Harry A. Blackmun and for Chief Judge Clement F. Haynsworth Jr. of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 4th Circuit. He also practiced law at the firm Robinson, Bradshaw & Hinson in Charlotte, N.C., where he later became a partner.

Coenen earned his bachelor's degree from the University of Wisconsin and his law degree from Cornell University, where he served as editor-in-chief of the Cornell Law Review.

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